Monthly Archives: November 2016

Role for neurons

Researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory have developed a new computational model of a neural circuit in the brain, which could shed light on the biological role of inhibitory neurons — neurons that keep other neurons from firing.

The model describes a neural circuit consisting of an array of input neurons and an equivalent number of output neurons. The circuit performs what neuroscientists call a “winner-take-all” operation, in which signals from multiple input neurons induce a signal in just one output neuron.

Using the tools of theoretical computer science, the researchers prove that, within the context of their model, a certain configuration of inhibitory neurons provides the most efficient means of enacting a winner-take-all operation. Because the model makes empirical predictions about the behavior of inhibitory neurons in the brain, it offers a good example of the way in which computational analysis could aid neuroscience.

The researchers will present their results this week at the conference on Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science. Nancy Lynch, the NEC Professor of Software Science and Engineering at MIT, is the senior author on the paper. She’s joined by Merav Parter, a postdoc in her group, and Cameron Musco, an MIT graduate student in electrical engineering and computer science.

For years, Lynch’s group has studied communication and resource allocation in ad hoc networks — networks whose members are continually leaving and rejoining. But recently, the team has begun using the tools of network analysis to investigate biological phenomena.

“There’s a close correspondence between the behavior of networks of computers or other devices like mobile phones and that of biological systems,” Lynch says. “We’re trying to find problems that can benefit from this distributed-computing perspective, focusing on algorithms for which we can prove mathematical properties.”

Artificial neurology

In recent years, artificial neural networks — computer models roughly based on the structure of the brain — have been responsible for some of the most rapid improvement in artificial-intelligence systems, from speech transcription to face recognition software.

An artificial neural network consists of “nodes” that, like individual neurons, have limited information-processing power but are densely interconnected. Data are fed into the first layer of nodes. If the data received by a given node meet some threshold criterion — for instance, if it exceeds a particular value — the node “fires,” or sends signals along all of its outgoing connections.

Each of those outgoing connections, however, has an associated “weight,” which can augment or diminish a signal. Each node in the next layer of the network receives weighted signals from multiple nodes in the first layer; it adds them together, and again, if their sum exceeds some threshold, it fires. Its outgoing signals pass to the next layer, and so on.

Tips to make manageable big data

One way to handle big data is to shrink it. If you can identify a small subset of your data set that preserves its salient mathematical relationships, you may be able to perform useful analyses on it that would be prohibitively time consuming on the full set.

The methods for creating such “coresets” vary according to application, however. Last week, at the Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the University of Haifa in Israel presented a new coreset-generation technique that’s tailored to a whole family of data analysis tools with applications in natural-language processing, computer vision, signal processing, recommendation systems, weather prediction, finance, and neuroscience, among many others.

“These are all very general algorithms that are used in so many applications,” says Daniela Rus, the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and senior author on the new paper. “They’re fundamental to so many problems. By figuring out the coreset for a huge matrix for one of these tools, you can enable computations that at the moment are simply not possible.”

As an example, in their paper the researchers apply their technique to a matrix — that is, a table — that maps every article on the English version of Wikipedia against every word that appears on the site. That’s 1.4 million articles, or matrix rows, and 4.4 million words, or matrix columns.

That matrix would be much too large to analyze using low-rank approximation, an algorithm that can deduce the topics of free-form texts. But with their coreset, the researchers were able to use low-rank approximation to extract clusters of words that denote the 100 most common topics on Wikipedia. The cluster that contains “dress,” “brides,” “bridesmaids,” and “wedding,” for instance, appears to denote the topic of weddings; the cluster that contains “gun,” “fired,” “jammed,” “pistol,” and “shootings” appears to designate the topic of shootings.

Joining Rus on the paper are Mikhail Volkov, an MIT postdoc in electrical engineering and computer science, and Dan Feldman, director of the University of Haifa’s Robotics and Big Data Lab and a former postdoc in Rus’s group.

The researchers’ new coreset technique is useful for a range of tools with names like singular-value decomposition, principal-component analysis, and latent semantic analysis. But what they all have in common is dimension reduction: They take data sets with large numbers of variables and find approximations of them with far fewer variables.

In this, these tools are similar to coresets. But coresets are application-specific, while dimension-reduction tools are general-purpose. That generality makes them much more computationally intensive than coreset generation — too computationally intensive for practical application to large data sets.

The researchers believe that their technique could be used to winnow a data set with, say, millions of variables — such as descriptions of Wikipedia pages in terms of the words they use — to merely thousands. At that point, a widely used technique like principal-component analysis could reduce the number of variables to mere hundreds, or even lower.